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Photos: North Carolina Announced 100% of Precincts Were Reported On Election Night – Now They Claim That 94% Of The Ballots Are Counted

The outcome of elections for North Carolina’s top elections likely won’t be settled for at least several more days as mail-in ballots trickle in and provisional ballots are scrutinized statewide.

The state’s results on the presidential election, as well as many statewide races, is too early to call, since as many as 116,000 mail-in absentee ballots sent to voters haven’t been returned but can be counted if received by county elections offices by Nov. 12.

The State Board of Elections announced on Thursday that roughly 41,000 provisional ballots cast on Election Day also will be examined by county boards. Ballots cast by qualified voters will be added to county tabulations late next week.

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As the wait continues in the race for the next president of the United States information about North Carolina elections surface that could rise huge tensions.

The state of North Carolina announced that 100% of precincts reported at 11:40 pm on election night.

 

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If all of their precincts were counted they had no need to continue counting.

North Carolina Sen. Thom Tillis, Sen. Richard Burr and Cal Cunningham have been asked to give statements on the President Donald Trump’s allegations of election rigging, fraud and illegal votes.

Andrew Romeo with the Tillis Campaign responded with the following statement:

“As he has said before, Senator Tillis has confidence in the absentee ballot process. He believes every legal vote should be counted, and that when they are, both he and President Trump will carry North Carolina.”

North Carolina State Board of Elections Executive Director Karen Brinson Bell said most counties will not start counting mailed-in ballots coming in between now and Nov. 12 until Nov. 12.

This means the race for the White House could be called without North Carolina being declared.